Monday, April 7, 2008

Their Heart Was in the Right Place

Here is a Strange-
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (AP) Terry Cottle and Sonny Graham never met, but the two men shared two very important things: A heart and a wife.

They also died the same way: Cottle, 12 years ago from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at the Summerville home he shared with his wife, Cheryl; the 69-year-old Graham died the same way last week outside his Vidalia, Georgia, home that he shared with his wife, Cheryl.

When Cottle died at age 33, his organs were donated. Grateful for his new heart, Graham began writing letters to the donor's family to thank them. In January 1997, Graham and Cheryl Cottle, then 28, met in Charleston. In 2001, Graham bought a home for Cottle and her four children in Vidalia. Three years later, they were married.

Five years later, Graham knew why Cottle had taken his own life.
Steer clear of the widow Cottle-Graham!


Heart transplant recipient Sonny Graham, left,
and his wife, Cheryl, pray during a moment
of silence in this Dec. 1, 2006 file photo.

4 comments:

BPD in OKC said...

I'm not trying to be insensitive or anything, but the first time I read that story over the weekend, my first reaction was "wow that woman must be a horrible wife to have both guys kill themselves like that."

Yeah I'm not the most pleasant person in the world, but I'm ok with that.

LOL :D

The Localmalcontent said...

Pleasant or not, you think clearly about the woman I believe.
~apparently more pleasant than she.

Brother John said...

Particularly interesting to one who works for an Organ and Tissue Transplantation Organization. Hate to see anyone waste a "Gift of Life". Just like I hate to see an alcoholic liver recipient go back on the bottle.

And yes... it would be understandable to consider avoiding a woman with that background!

By the way... nice music on your site! Quite a nice variety. Haven't heard anything that wasn't enjoyable.

Brother John
Lansdowne, Pennsylvania USA

Brother John said...

Working for one of the largest Organ and Transplant organizations in the world, I do hear some bizarre stories. But ultimately I am saddened when a person throws away their gift. It's like when we hear a recovering alcoholic Liver recipient has gone back on the bottle. Someone cares enough to give you their gift of life, and you toss it. Sad.

Brother John
Lansdowne, Pennsylvania USA