Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Baloney

Here we all go again, the government, via the U.S.D.A. report, pp 3-6, ( a PDF file ) scaring everyone with family food scarcity statistics.

According to the survey, 88.9% of all American families were "food secure".
According to the survey, 7.0% of all American families had low "food security".
According to the survey, only 4.1% of all American families had very low "food security".

In my interpretation, that's pretty durned fantastic~!
WooHoo! Way to go, America!

"But", food insecure families may ask, "Isn't a full pantry of healthy and nutritious gourmet foods one of the rights guaranteed by the Guv'ment?!!?"

(uh, No.)

Nearly every day, I witness someone buying Hershey bars or 2-litre bottles of Dr. Pepper or Pepsi with food stamps. Junk foods, snacks, candy. Purchased with monies supplied by responsible, 'food secure' taxpayers. Instead of potatoes, tomatoes, hamburger meat or ham.
Purchased at convenience stores. Instead of grocery stores or supermarkets.
(I know a convenience store assistant manager, who says "You're welcome", instead of "Thank you" to food stamp users who purchase soda pop and candy there. I admire him for his boldness.)

So is this needy 4.1% really food insecure, or simply negligent and irresponsible for their family's, their children's hunger, themselves?

The following 18 Questions were asked of 54,000 American households. Said to be "representative" of all of this bountiful nation's 118-million households' populace.
Answer them yourselves, and find out if you too, are 'food insecure', and in need:

1. "We worried whether our food would run out before we got money to
buy more." Was that often, sometimes, or never true for you in the last 12
months?

2. "The food that we bought just didn’t last and we didn’t have money to get more."
Was that often, sometimes, or never true for you in the last 12 months?

3. "We couldn’t afford to eat balanced meals." Was that often, sometimes, or
never true for you in the last 12 months?

4. In the last 12 months, did you or other adults in the household ever cut the
size of your meals or skip meals because there wasn’t enough money for
food? (Yes/No)

5. (If yes to Question 4) How often did this happen—almost every month,
some months but not every month, or in only 1 or 2 months?

6. In the last 12 months, did you ever eat less than you felt you should because
there wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No) [INCREDIBLE QUESTION~! EVEN ONE INSTANCE, MEANS "YES"]

7. In the last 12 months, were you ever hungry, but didn’t eat, because there
wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No)
[THAT OUGHTTA BE 100%]

8. In the last 12 months, did you lose weight because there wasn’t enough
money for food? (Yes/No) [Good. Americans are too fat, statistics say]

9. In the last 12 months did you or other adults in your household ever not eat
for a whole day because there wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No)

10. (If yes to Question 9) How often did this happen—almost every month,
some months but not every month, or in only 1 or 2 months?

(Questions 11-18 were asked only if the household included children age 0-18)
11. "We relied on only a few kinds of low-cost food to feed our children because
we were running out of money to buy food." Was that often, sometimes, or
never true for you in the last 12 months? [What about "Seldom" as an answer?]

12. "We couldn’t feed our children a balanced meal, because we couldn’t
afford that." Was that often, sometimes, or never true for you in the last 12
months?

13. "The children were not eating enough because we just couldn’t afford
enough food." Was that often, sometimes, or never true for you in the last
12 months?

14. In the last 12 months, did you ever cut the size of any of the children’s
meals because there wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No)

15. In the last 12 months, were the children ever hungry but you just couldn’t
afford more food? (Yes/No)

16. In the last 12 months, did any of the children ever skip a meal because there
wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No)

17. (If yes to Question 16) How often did this happen—almost every month,
some months but not every month, or in only 1 or 2 months?

18. In the last 12 months, did any of the children ever not eat for a whole day
because there wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No)

Do you see how, if you had cut out just one meal per day per month from your perfect regimen, you were considered by the U.S.D.A. to be "food insecure" to some degree? I do not mean to be miserly, to sound mean and evil on this topic,
but really!!, Who could not honestly admit 'Yes' to even once in the past year being hungry yet having no cash to get something to eat, there and then?

Here's a good question #19: Did anyone in your family in the past 12 months die from starvation, because there wasn't enough money in your food stamp card? (yes/no)
(If Yes to Q. 19, Prove It.)


*** *** ***

WOW
WOW WOW!!!
Woohoo!!
Rush Limbaugh cites the Local Malcontent bloggie's consternation on food stats here,
saying "a small Oklahoma blogger calls the USDA's report "Baloney ... "', at the 2-hour, 22-minute point of his today's Excellence in Broadcasting radio show!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you, Mr. Limbaugh;
I knew that you looked in here, from time to time...~!~!

4 comments:

Christopher Willis said...

As a young boy growing up in the mid 1970's I never went hungry. My mother divorced my father when I was seven and married twice more between 1976 and 1977; I have had the same step father since I was eight. during the time between husbands my mother made sure that I
had at least two meals at home a day, I ate at school or daycare for the third. My mother never applied for food stamps or TANF. Never. Why, you might ask? She did not see the need. She worked two jobs at times and there was always beans and corn meal and milk and eggs and
bread and oats in the house. Sure the dollar now is more inflated than it was in 1976 but wise spending never goes out of fashion. My mother fed me. I grew up and only used food stamps once for three months to make sure that my wife (at the time) and my daughter had food after I lost my job and my wife was in school; on food stuffs. After my mother married Mr. Willis, times were still tough for a family of three and when my brother came along, that was one more mouth to feed. My father was a police officer until he retired and mom stayed at home to raise us boys full time. My parents became born again Christians after my sister died in 1980 and they learned to rely on the Lord for all of their needs and we never missed a meal that I can remember. Never. Ever.
This comment may not have a neat ending but the point is that I do not like that others abuse the system because they are just too lazy to work for what they have and rely on my taxes to fix their Twinkie jones. Thanks, Ron for letting me rant. C-)

The Localmalcontent said...

Your Comment, Sir, stands alone as the final, consument statement on how self-determined families can make do, and make ends meet.

I can add nothing here, except my highest regards to your family.

Jungle Mom said...

WOW!!! Rush Limbaugh????
This report was probably given right after the one showing the alarming rate of American obesity, especially among the 'poor'.
I'm sorry, but I have seen real starvation. I have witnessed people searching and hunting for food for days, surviving on grubs and such. Americans are so far from hungry I can't even express the vast distances between the two!
I have had to re-feed starving children carefully increasing the amount of calories because the shock to their system from the calories equivalent to one American meal would have killed them.

BobG said...

It's been my experience that in most of the families where the children don't get proper nutrition the problem is NOT lack of resources; usually it is badly allocated finances to blame. More than once I have seen parents who are substance abusers use the food money for their habits. Anyone can get help these days, if they really need it.